Module: Integrated Agricultural Systems

Module details

  • Module code

    4038a
  • Module leader

    Dr Nicola Cannon
  • Module Level

    7
  • Module credits

    15
  • Min study time

    150
  • Contact hrs

    36
  • Teaching Period

    Semester 1

Module content

Introduction to major temperate and tropical farming systems and the relationships with agro-climatic zones.  Economic, political and environmental pressures on agriculture.  Changing global markets and consumer demand.  Introduction to the concept of sustainable intensification.  Social, cultural, ethical and safety considerations and their effect on food security.  Enterprise analysis of a range of crops, animal and mixed farming systems, including agro-forestry, aquaponics, urban farming and smallholder gardens.  Integrated approaches to crop protection, soil management and nutrient management will be highlighted through the farming enterprises examples covered.  Special attention will be given to conservation of the world's sub- and topsoil.  Students will take part in a UK visit designed to stimulate discussion about integrated farm management in temperate countries.

Module outcomes

To achieve credit for this module, students must be able to:

  1. Evaluate the potential and limitations of contrasting agricultural systems.
  2. Critically evaluate social, economic, political and environmental influences on these systems.
  3. Use a case study approach to analyse the effects of integrated farm management approaches on sustainability of agricultural systems around the world.

Assessment

Assessment Description Weighting
First Sit Coursework: Group case study (LO 3) 50%
First Sit Examination: 3 hours unseen (LO 1,2) 50%
Referral (capped at 40%) Coursework: Individual case study 50%
Referral (capped at 40%) Examination: 3 hours unseen 50%

Key texts

BEDDINGTON, J. (2011). The future of Food and Farming: Challenges and
Choices for Global Sustainability. The Government Office for Science. HMSO.

CONWAY, G and WAAGE, J. (2010). Science and Innovation for Development.
UK Collaborative on Development Sciences (UKCDS). London.

GIL, J.D.B; Cohn, A.S.; Duncan, J.; Newton, P. and Vermuelen, S. (2017). The Resilience of Integrated Agricultural Systems to Climate Change. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change. CABI.

GOODING, M. J. and DAVIES, W. P. (1997). Wheat Production and Utilisation:
Systems, Quality and the Environment. CABI International, Wallingford.

GREENLAND, D. J. (1997). The Sustainability of Rice Farming. CABI
International, Wallingford.

HOOFT, K. E. v., WOLLEN, T. S. and BHANDARI, D.P. (2012) Sustainable
livestock management for poverty alleviation and food security. CABI.

IFAD (2011). Rural Poverty Report: New realities, new challenges and new
opportunities for tomorrow's generation. International Fund for Agricultural
development (IFAD), Rome.

IWMI (2016) Working Papers- Adaptation Measures in Agricultural Systems. CGIAR

INGRAM, J.; ERICKSEN, P.; LIVERMAN, D. (Eds) (2010). Food Security and
Global Environmental Change. Earthscan, London.

PINSTRUP-ANDERSEN, P. and PANDYA-LORCH, R. (2002). The Unfinished
Agenda. International Food Policy research Institute (IFRI), Washington DC.

REEVES, T.G.; RAJARAM, S.; VAN GINKEL, M.; TRETHOWAN, R.; BRAUN,
H -J and CASSADY, K. (1999). New Wheats for a Secure Sustainable Future.
CIMMYT (International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center). Mexico.

ROONEY, D. (2013). Sustainable Soil Management. Apple Academic Press.

SPIELMAN, D.J. and PANDYA-LORCH, R. (2009). Millions Fed: Proven
Successes in Agricultural Development. IFPRI, Washington DC.

STEINFELD, H., GERBER, P., WASSENAAR, T., CASTEL, V., ROSALES, M.
and DE HAAN, C. (2006) Livestock's Long Shadow: environmental issues and
options. Livestock, Environment and Development (LEAD) Initiative. UN Food
and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), Rome.